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Life After Death Album Sales UPD


Life After Death is the second and final studio album by American rapper The Notorious B.I.G., released on March 25, 1997, on Bad Boy Records and Arista Records.[4] A double album, it was released sixteen days after his murder. It features collaborations with guest artists such as 112, Jay-Z, Lil' Kim, Mase, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Too $hort, Angela Winbush, D.M.C. of Run-D.M.C., R. Kelly, The Lox, and Puff Daddy. Life After Death exhibits The Notorious B.I.G. further delving into the mafioso rap subgenre. The album is a sequel to his first album, Ready to Die, and picks up where the last song, "Suicidal Thoughts", ends.




Life After Death Album Sales



Life After Death received widespread acclaim from critics upon release. Jon Pareles of The New York Times described the album as "flaunting affluence with a leisurely swagger, midtempo grooves and calmly arrogant raps".[23] Anthony DeCurtis of Rolling Stone magazine called it a "conscious continuation of Ready to Die", and stated "Life After Death captures crime's undeniable glamour but doesn't stint on the fear, desperation and irretrievable loss that the streets inevitably exact".[20] Cheo Hodari Coker from the Los Angeles Times wrote that "Life After Death reflects both the dark and the heartfelt sides of the rapper's Gemini personality. It's not only a complex testament to who he was in his private life, but also a demonstration of his amazing rhyming ability. In key moments, B.I.G. does a marvelous job of surfing between accessible music fare tailored for the radio, and more challenging material that will be savored by hard-core rap fans who have long admired B.I.G.'s microphone skills. Rarely has a rapper attempted to please so many different audiences and done it so brilliantly".[17] In a five-mic review for The Source, Michael A. Gonzales felt that it would "undoubtedly become a classic to any true hip-hop fan".[24] Although David Browne of Entertainment Weekly was unfavorable of the album's long length, and some of its violent and materialistic content, he commended Notorious B.I.G.'s "bicoastal respect" by working with other hip-hop styles and artists from other regions of the United States.[15]


Life After Death is the second and final studio album by American rapper The Notorious B.I.G., released in 1997 on Bad Boy Records. A double album, it was released posthumously following his death on 9 March 1997. It features collaborations with guest artists such as 112, Jay-Z, Lil' Kim, Ma$e, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Too $hort, Angela Winbush, D.M.C. of Run-D.M.C., R. Kelly, The LOX, and Puff Daddy. Life After Death exhibits The Notorious B.I.G. further delving into the mafioso rap subgenre, which was predominant in East Coast hip hop at the time.


Second and final studio album from the late great Christopher Wallce aka The Notorious BIG aka Biggie Smalls. The album was released 16 days after his death in 1997 and went on to become one of the best selling rap albums of all time.


The Notorious B.I.G.'s second album, 1997's Life After Death, was meant to be a sprawling celebration of his talents. It became a larger-than-life memorial to his lyrical talent and ambition, arriving in record stores 16 days after a hail of gunfire silenced his voice. This year, a deluxe box set will pay tribute to Life After Death - part of a year-long celebration planned in honor of what would have been his 50th birthday in 2022.


While sales of the album were undoubtedly fueled by the tragic circumstances that preceded the release, Life After Death remains a cornerstone of late '90s hip-hop. The album topped the U.S. album charts for four weeks, while "Hypnotize" and "Mo Money, Mo Problems" spent a total of five weeks at No. 1 as well - two of four tracks from the Bad Boy label that spent a combined 22 weeks on top in 1997. The album was nominated for three Grammy Awards and was named as one of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


A double album, Life After Death was released sixteen days after his death. It features collaborations with guest artists such as 112, Jay-Z, Lil' Kim, Mase, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Too $hort, Angela Winbush, D.M.C. of Run-D.M.C., The Lox, and Puff Daddy. Life After Death exhibits The Notorious B.I.G. further delving into the mafioso rap subgenre. The album is a sequel to his first album, Ready to Die, and picks up where the last song, "Suicidal Thoughts", ends.


Even before the funereal imagery of Life After Death, in which Wallace looked to be already in mourning for himself as well as serving as his own undertaker, he was already akin to a ghostly presence weighing in from the afterlife after the disturbing climax of the final track on his '94 debut Ready to Die, a gunshot that connotes the artist committing suicide.


Moreover, with Wallace's death coming barely two years after the O.J. Simpson trial and five years after the acquittal of four Los Angeles Police Department officers in the beating of Rodney King, distrust of the LAPD remained high among minority communities. The tentacles of the Notorious B.I.G. investigation would also reach into the LAPD's infamous Rampart scandal of the late 1990s, when Rafael Perez, himself a dirty cop, alleged that more than 70 officers who worked the anti-gang beat were guilty of planting evidence, stealing drugs, unlawful beatings and shootings and more while working within largely Hispanic territory. Twenty-four officers were ultimately punished, but only five fired outright. Detectives drew links from Perez to Knight and Biggie's death, but the theory went that LAPD brass wanted to keep Perez out of further trouble so he would be a better witness in the corruption case.


"As we were driving, [from] my car], I heard shots ring out," Combs said in an interview on March 28, 1997, his first time speaking out after his friend's death. "At first I just thought it was someone shooting in the air, and just human reaction I immediately ducked...Everybody in my car ducked down. Then I heard somebody yell, 'They shot at Biggie's car.'" He shook his head.


Thirty years ago on this day Run-D.M.C. were rewarded for its high sales, as its self-titled first album became the first hip-hop album in history to earn "Gold" status-which indicates more than 100,000 copies sold-nine months after its release. Hip-hop has come a long way in terms of styles and popularity in those 30 years, so the group's first album is far from the highest sellers in the genre anymore. Check out the current list of the bestselling hip-hop albums in history, from ten to one:


Not all of the albums on this list are new school, although this Beastie Boys album is the only '80s hip-hop album to land in the Top 10 best-selling. This album goes so far back into the Def Jam archives that it came about at the same time as when Slayer was signed to the label (guitarist Kerry King is featured on the album). Still considered the brightest spot in the Beastie Boys' discography, it features hits such as "(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party!)" and "No Sleep Till Brooklyn". It got another boost in sales following the death of Adam Yauch during 2012.


It's often said, perhaps by Jay Z more than anyone else, that no one appreciates your art until your dead. It's sad to say but The Notorious B.I.G. probably found this out firsthand after his murder during 1997. His second album, the spookily titled Life After Death, was released just over two weeks after his death and fans were eager to get their hands on it to remember one of the greatest emcees of all time. It, like All Eyez, maintains consistent quality across its lengthy 24 tracks (on the deluxe version that is).


Eminem dropped The Marshall Mathers LP into the perfect storm for racking up album sales: On one hand, all of the media he was getting for his controversial lyrics and skin tone made him undeniably popular among a white audience who might have ignored hip-hop otherwise. On the other hand, The Marshall Mathers LP is one of the most critically acclaimed hip-hop albums of all time, which brought in fans from other genres who were generally curious to hear his words. The hype was such that Eminem even broke Britney Spears' record for the best-selling week for a solo artist.


The album has an iconic status but many forget that it was actually a slow burner when it was released, having only moved 57,000 copies in its first week album sales. The album picked up momentum when Biggie dropped 'Big Poppa', but wasn't certified platinum till 1999, two years after Biggie's death.


First his break from making the album, Biggie would write all of the lyrics he created down in a notebook. But after returning to record the second half a year on, he would record the raps entirely from memory, never writing his lyrics down.


Life after Death was a classic album by The Notorious B.I.G., his second and final album. I remember when this album came out in 1997, everyone knows the rest of the story. Another artist lost early in his career to tragedy, who knows what other music he may have released. I had quite a few requests for this album and artistically was a very difficult one to approach. The album is a sepia toned photograph of him standing beside a hearse. I wanted to embellish the album but also stay true to the tone of the record so I started by stitching all of the background detail in tonal abstract stitches with wool thread and then as an added touch I embroidered his silhouette on top of the existing image in flame orange, I wanted him to appear to float over the background. As a finishing touch I added the album title and his name as patches mounted to the album cover.


Stepwise regression model is used when there are a lot of independent variables to consider for explaining the dependent variable. In this case, there are only 2 independent variables: album publicity and artist death status. Using stepwise regression would be time consuming and inefficient. 350c69d7ab


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